Lavender Field Growing Information and References

Lavender farmers often have questions about what varieties will work best for them in their particular region. This is not, however, replacement for your own homework in any way, and makes no guarantee of suitability of success in your specific area or intended purpose.

Taking cuttings of Lavender Phenomenal

WORK TO BE DONE BEFORE PURCHASING PLANTS

*Frequently asked questions from lavender farmers are often ones we don’t feel comfortable answering but we do have resources available to them.*

SOIL AND WATER TESTING:

• Local extension agencies are available for water and soil testing, but are often lacking in covering all nutrients.
• In order to know if one needs fertilizer or soil amendments, a good source of testing is JR Peters Lab. They work with many growers www.jrpeterslab.com

FIELD PREP:

• Drainage is key. Raised berms or beds can be used or planting on sloped areas.
• Loamy soil is better than adding sand or gravel. Sand+gravel+clay=concrete

SUN AND TEMPERATURE REQUIREMENTS

• All lavenders need full sun and a winter vernalization period in order to bloom.
• Vernalization is achieved during the winter months. Rule of thumb is 8 weeks of cool nights.
• Each lavender has its own cold zone limit and humidity tolerance which will be indicated later in this form.

WHY ARE YOU GROWING LAVENDER?
  • Uses are culinary, oil distillation, dried flowers, and cut flower production.
  • Each variety has its own distinct character – check our list to find out which variety can work for you.
INFORMATION PULLED FROM WEB
  • SuperBlue‘ angustifolia, deep violet-blue colored flowers, mounded-compact growth, very good cold hardiness, tolerant of heat and humidity. U.S. Plant Patent #24,929
  • Big Time Blue’, angustifolia, large deep blue flowers, silver foliage. Patented, propagation prohibited
  • Edelweiss lavender, angustifolia, true white flower. Edelweiss is a very compact grower, with a deep green leaf.
  • Hidcote Blue’ is a classic semi-dwarf English lavender, growing to 18 inches in flower. Excellent selection for drying, flowers dry dark. Hidcote Blue’ is good culinary.
  • Munstead’ , bushy plant, growing to no more than 18 inches in bloom. Very early spring bloomer – it can bloom as early as mid April in central California. Like ‘Hidcote’ it is an excellent choice for cooking. Nice selection for containers, as the highly aromatic foliage is desirable even when the plant is not blooming.
  • Provence’ lavender, an intermedia, robust grower, good for sachets. NOT for essential oil, but can be used for fragrance products and as a flavoring used sparingly.
ADDITIONAL ONLINE RESOURCES

Michigan State – online lavender curriculum

Beagle Ridge Lavendergrowing advice

Mesa Lavender- Curtis Swift  Swift Horticultural Enterprises